José Andrés and Ambassadors on the Culinary Roots of Culture

José Andrés (left) and Kathleen Merrigan start the discussion at the second "Sustainable Plate" event. (Photos by William Atkins
José Andrés (left) and Kathleen Merrigan start the discussion at the second "Sustainable Plate" event. (Photos by William Atkins/GW Today)
Second "Sustainable Plate" class takes a journey from Europe to Haiti and Jamaica.
March 08, 2016
In 1826, Mary Randolph’s essential guide to authentic American cooking, “The Virginia Housewife, or Methodical Cook,” was published. More than 200 years later, among the book’s recipes for oyster catsup and rabbit soup, chef and activist José Andrés stumbled upon a recipe for gazpacho, a traditional dish in Spain, his country of birth.
 
For Mr. Andrés, the book became a symbol of the long-shared, diverse culinary and cultural history of America—a cultural history that he was now a part of as an immigrant-turned-American citizen.